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MLB in Washington highlights
09/29/2004 4:58 PM ET
  • 1883 - The first recorded meeting of a professional baseball team and the United States President took place at the White House. The Cleveland franchise in the National League met with President Chester A. Arthur.

  • January 1886 - The National League admitted the Washington franchise to begin play in the National League for the 1886 season. Washington replaced the Providence franchise.

  • March 1900 - Washington was one of four franchises contracted when the National League reduced its membership from 12 to 8. Reportedly, the franchise was purchased for $10,000.

  • January 1901 - Former Western League President Ban Johnson formally organized the American League with eight franchises, including the Washington Senators.

  • April 26, 1901 - Washington Senators played their first game in the newly established American League against the Philadelphia Athletics at Shibe Park. The Senators won 5-1.

  • April 29, 1901 - The Washington Senators defeated the Baltimore Orioles, 5-2, in the first American League game played in Washington, DC.

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  • July 2, 1903 - Washington outfielder and future Hall of Famer Ed Delahanty was killed when he was swept away over Niagara Falls.

  • August 2, 1907 - Nineteen-year-old Walter Johnson made his Major League debut with Washington and lost to Detroit, 3-2. The future Hall of Famer gave up his first hit to Ty Cobb, a bunt single.

  • September 7, 1908 - Washington pitcher Walter Johnson shut out the New York Yankees (then called Highlanders) for the third consecutive game over a span of four days.

  • April 14, 1910 - United States President William Howard Taft became the first President to throw the first pitch prior to a Major League Baseball game.

  • October 30, 1911 - Clark Griffith was named manager of the Washington franchise, where he would remain a prominent figure - as manager and then owner -- until his death in 1955.

  • May 19, 1918 - Washington defeated Cleveland, 1-0 in 18 innings, in the first Sunday baseball game played in Washington, DC. Reportedly, a crowd of more than 15,000 was in attendance at American League Base Ball Park.

  • November 10, 1919 - Clark Griffith became Washington club owner and president when he joined William Richardson in purchasing the controlling interest of the Senators for $175,000.

  • May 14, 1920 - Walter Johnson defeated the Detroit Tigers for his 300th career victory.

  • July 1, 1920 - Walter Johnson pitched first no-hitter in Senators history, defeating the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park, 1-0. The only base runner allowed by Johnson reached on an error by Bucky Harris.

  • September 29, 1924 - The Washington Senators defeated the Boston Red Sox, 4-2, behind the pitching of Walter Johnson and clinched the first pennant in franchise history.

  • October 10, 1924 - The Senators defeated the New York Giants, four games to three, to win the World Series, the first and only in the history of the franchise.

  • May 2, 1926 - Walter Johnson won his 400th career game with a 4-3 victory over the Philadelphia Athletics.

  • August 2, 1927 - Washington celebrated Walter Johnson Day at Griffith Stadium on the 20th anniversary of his Major League debut. Johnson was presented with various gifts prior to the game against the Detroit Tigers.

  • October 15, 1928 - Former Washington pitcher Walter Johnson signed a three-year contract to manage the team.

  • August 8, 1931 - Bobby Burke pitched the first no-hitter at Griffith Stadium by a Senators pitcher, defeating the Boston Red Sox, 5-0.

  • September 21, 1934 - The Washington Senators defeated the St. Louis, 2-1, and clinched their third and final American League pennant.

  • February 6, 1936 - Washington Senators pitcher Walter Johnson was part of the first class of players voted into the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, NY.

  • November 5, 1940 - Walter Johnson was defeated as a Republican candidate in an attempt to run for a U.S. House of Representative seat from the State of Maryland.

  • May 28, 1941 - The Washington Senators hosted the New York Yankees at Griffith Stadium in the first night game ever held in Washington, DC. Future Senators general manager George Selkirk hit a pinch-hit grand slam off future Senators pitching coach Sid Hudson in the top of the eighth inning to propel the Yankees to a 6-5 win.

  • 1946 - Washington surpassed one million fans for the first and only time in franchise history, establishing a new franchise record for single season attendance (1,027,216). The Senators also drew more than one million fans on the road (1,055,171) that season.

  • September 7, 1947 - Washington's Joe Kuehl hit the only home run by the home team at Griffith Stadium all year long. It was an inside-the-park homer against the New York Yankees.

  • April 17, 1953 - New York Yankees outfielder Mickey Mantle was credited with what many consider to be the longest home run in baseball history. It was estimated to have traveled 565 feet at Washington's Griffith Stadium off Senators pitcher Chuck Stobbs.

  • 1957 - Washington's Roy Sievers became the first player in franchise history to lead the American League in home runs with 42. Sievers outdistanced future Hall of Famers Ted Williams of the Boston Red Sox (34) (38) and Mickey Mantle of the New York Yankees (34) to capture the home run title.

  • October 27, 1960 - Washington Senators president Calvin Griffith was granted permission to move the franchise to Minneapolis. The American League also admitted an expansion team to Washington, DC, to replace the Senators.

  • November 17, 1960 - A native of Washington and head of the Federal Aviation Administration, Elvin Quesada was awarded the expansion Washington Senators.

  • September 21, 1961 - The Washington Senators played their final game at Griffith Stadium and lost to the Minnesota Twins, 6-3, before 1,498 fans.

  • April 9, 1962 - District of Columbia Stadium, later renamed Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium in 1969, was opened as the new home of the expansion Washington Senators. The Senators defeated the Detroit Tigers, 4-1, before a crowd of 42,143 fans including President John F. Kennedy.

  • August 1, 1962 - An all-time Washington record crowd of 48,147 fans attend a doubleheader at District of Columbia Stadium against the New York Yankees.

  • September 12, 1962 - Washington pitcher Tom Cheney established a new Major League record when he struck out 21 batters during a 16-inning victory at Baltimore.

  • April 11, 1966 - Emmett Ashford became the first African-American umpire to work a Major League game when he worked the Cleveland-Washington opening day game at D.C. Stadium. U.S. Vice President Hubert Humphrey was among the crowd of 44,468.

  • June 12, 1967 - The Washington Senators defeated the Chicago White Sox, 6-5, in 22 innings at D.C. Stadium, marking the longest night game in baseball history. It required 6 hours, 38 minutes and ended at 2:43 a.m.

  • April 8, 1969 - The New York Yankees spoiled the managerial debut of Ted Williams at RFK Stadium in Washington, 8-4. More than 45,000 fans - including President Richard Nixon - were in attendance.

  • June 5, 1969 - Washington held the first overall pick in the Major League Baseball Rule 4 Draft for the first and only time since the draft's inception in 1965. The Senators chose outfielder Jeff Burroughs from Wilson High School in Long Beach, Calif.

  • July 22, 1969 - For the first time in its history, the All-Star Game was postponed due to rain. The game was played the following day at RFK Stadium and hometown favorite Frank Howard delighted the fans with homer.

  • September 30, 1971 - The 10,852nd and last game played in Washington ended in a forfeit win for the New York Yankees. The Senators led 7-5 with two out in the top of the ninth when fans stormed onto the field, tearing it up. The field could not be cleared and the umpire called the game.

    This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.


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