Buddy Bell, Vice President/Assistant General Manager

Buddy Bell begins his ninth season in the White Sox organization and first as vice president of player development and special assignments. Bell spent the 2009-11 seasons as director of player development after serving as director of minor league instruction in 2008, a post he also held with the Sox from 1991-93.

Prior to joining the White Sox, Bell spent 13 seasons on majorleague staffs, including nine as manager of Detroit (1996-98), Colorado (2000-02) and Kansas City (2005-07). He finished second in the 1997 American League Manager of the Year voting after guiding the Tigers to a 26-game improvement from 1996, the largest in the AL since Baltimore in 1988-89.

Bell played 18 seasons with Cleveland (1972-78), Texas (1979- 85, '89), Cincinnati (1985-88) and Houston (1988), hitting .279 (2,514-8,995) with 201 home runs and 1,106 RBI in 2,405 games. He was a five-time AL All-Star (1973, 1980-82, '84) and won six consecutive Rawlings Gold Glove Awards from 1979-84, joining Brooks Robinson (16), Mike Schmidt (10), Scott Rolen (seven), Eric Chavez (six) and Robin Ventura (six) as the only third basemen in major-league history to win at least six.

Bell ranks among the all-time leaders at third base in total chances (3rd, 6,979), assists (4th, 4,925), double plays (5th, 430) and games played (6th, 2,183). He was elected to the Texas Rangers Hall of Fame in 2004.

He and his wife, Gloria, have five children: David, Michael, Ricky, Kristi and Traci. Bell and his father, Gus, who played in the major leagues from 1950-64, set a record for hits (4,337) by a father/ son duo (since broken by Barry and Bobby Bonds). David played in the major leagues from 1995-2006, Michael was selected by Texas in the first round (30th overall) in 1993, and Ricky was drafted by the Dodgers in the third round in 1997.

Bell attended Xavier University and Miami (Ohio) University. He graduated in 1969 from Moeller High School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He and his wife reside in Chandler, Ariz.


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