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Trammell not surprised by HOF vote
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01/07/2003  4:14 PM ET 
Trammell not surprised by HOF vote
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Alan Trammell retired as a player following the 1996 season. (Duane Burleson/AP)
DETROIT -- The only differences between Alan Trammell's Hall of Fame fortunes this year and last year were a few votes and no shortstop named Ozzie at the top of the list.

In his second year of eligibility, Trammell received 70 votes, or 14.1 percent of the 496 ballots cast. That's a slight drop from the 15.7 percent he took last year in his first year on the ballot. But if there's one big difference from Trammell this time, it's that he has plenty more to occupy his mind than the Hall of Fame.

"I'm not surprised," he said. "And again, as I've said to a lot of people, if I was a lot closer in my mind I would've been thinking about it more. But knowing about last year and with all the things I've been thinking about with managing the Tigers, it really wasn't a big deal."

Hall of Fame 2003

Induction Ceremony
Sunday, July 27
Cooperstown, New York

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Gary Carter | Eddie Murray

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He expects it'll stay that way for the next several years, at the very least until he becomes eligible for the Veterans Committee.

"I realize if it ever does happen it's going to be years from now," Trammell. "And I'm OK. I'm not going to campaign. I still feel like I'm going to be recognized as one of the better shortstops of my time. I had a very good career, not good enough for the Hall of Fame, and I'm fine with that."

He'll have to settle for the Hall of Fame treatment he'll receive in some of his first Tigers-related public appearances since being named manager last October. He'll meet many of his players for the first time next week during a conditioning mini-camp at Comerica Park, expected to feature two-thirds of the roster. He'll then join many of them for TigerFest Jan. 18 at Joe Louis Arena.


"I realize if it ever does happen it's going to be years from now. And I'm OK. I'm not going to campaign. I still feel like I'm going to be recognized as one of the better shortstops of my time. I had a very good career, not good enough for the Hall of Fame, and I'm fine with that."

-- Alan Trammell

From there, he'll play a major role in the Tigers' annual Winter Caravan across Michigan and Northwest Ohio and into Windsor, Ontario. A month later, he'll undoubtedly be the prime attraction in Lakeland as the Tigers arrive in Florida for Spring Training.

Trammell wasn't the only Tiger left looking down the list to find his name in the Hall of Fame voting results. He finished one place below former teammate Jack Morris, who took in 113 votes in his fourth year of eligibility. At 22.8 percent, it marked his best showing yet. Another ex-teammate, Mickey Tettleton, received no votes in his first year of eligibility and will be removed from the ballot.

As it stands, the only member of the 1984 world champion Tigers in the Hall is the manager, Sparky Anderson. While that could be looked upon as a snub of the talent that club had, it's also a testament to the team attitude that Trammell and others have repeatedly preached. Now, he'll be preaching it from the manager's pulpit.

"I'd prefer it that way, to be honest with you," Trammell said of the team outlook. "And I think people would agree to it. Maybe people are looking at (the '84 team) as not exactly superstars, but a team. That's the way we were taught and that's the way we played every day. Now as a manager, that's what I'm going to hope to get across."

Jason Beck is a reporter for MLB.com and can be reached at jason.beck@mlb.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.



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