MILWAUKEE -- Corey Hart's trade value may have taken a hit on Friday when the Brewers right fielder injured his right wrist attempting to catch a fly ball in the third inning of the 7-5 win over the Nationals.

But manager Ken Macha and the Brewers just want him in the lineup as soon as they can get him back.

As Washington second baseman Cristian Guzman drove a ball deep to right, Hart tracked it toward the right-field line and crashed into the wall as he attempted to catch the eventual foul ball.

Hart stayed in the game and finished out the top half of the inning, but was removed in favor of veteran outfielder Jim Edmonds, who pinch-hit for Hart in the bottom of the third and hit a decisive two-run homer in the seventh.

After leaving the game, Hart underwent X-rays and an MRI on his wrist, which revealed no fracture.

Brewers manager Ken Macha was unsure how long Hart would be out, but considering the way his right fielder has swung the bat since the middle of May, he certainly would like to have him in the lineup as soon as he can.

"He's day-to-day, as we all are," Macha said. "We've got other guys that can fill in. Edmonds won the game for us tonight. But [Hart] can have a sudden impact on the game at any time."

With Hart being the subject of a number of trade rumors this month, the injury could not have come at a more inconvenient time for the club, since any ailment or significant time missed complicates any trade discussions.

From his vantage point, though, Macha did not think the injury looked too significant.

He added that with the way Hart jammed his hand into the wall, the location of the injury required precautionary measures to be taken.

"When they were doing all the tests out in right field on him, it didn't look that bad," Macha said. "Where it was located, they were concerned there may be a small bone fracture in there, so they did the MRI."

Crew concerned with level of plunkings

MILWAUKEE -- The Brewers are tired of being bruised.

Entering Friday's game, they had been hit by pitches 50 times this season, most of any team. Rickie Weeks (18 times) and Prince Fielder (16 times) rank first and second in the Majors. The Cubs' Marlon Byrd has also been struck 16 times.

"It's happening far too often," outfielder Ryan Braun said. "Look, we understand that we're a team that hits for a lot of power and they have to pitch us inside. There's just times that guys are missing by too much with their fastballs, too often, to both [Weeks and Fielder]. That's not something we want to be a part of, and when it does happen, obviously, we have to do something about it."

Weeks declined to talk Thursday night about the Ross Ohlendorf pitch that struck him in the fifth inning and sparked some tempers on both sides of the field at PNC Park. Fielder, who had words with the umpires when the teams were warned later in the game, did not make himself available to reporters.

"I haven't seen the ball that Rickie got hit with," manager Ken Macha said after Thursday's game. "But from what I understand, it was in the middle of the batter's box."

After the incident Thursday night, Macha did his part to work on eliminating the problem.

"I had another conversation with people from Major League Baseball today," Macha said. "They're looking into it."

As for what he thinks should be done about the issue, Macha made it clear he thinks some suspensions should be in order for the pitchers who are hitting his players.

"They've got to get the guys that perpetrate what goes on," Macha said. "I don't know people's intent, but evidence is mounting. ... Fining and suspending managers, I don't think that's going to get it done. Managers aren't throwing the balls."

Macha said he hopes by talking to MLB officials that he can eliminate the problem before it reaches a point where his players are required to retaliate in a significant way.

He added that he doesn't think MLB would want such action to occur, either.

"That's why I'm using the avenues that I am. I don't think the alternative is what Major League Baseball wants, and that's going out and having a brawl," Macha said. "They don't want that. I think that's why they were trying to clean this up."

Miller Park largely spared from flooding

MILWAUKEE -- As up to eight inches of rain pounded the Milwaukee area on Thursday night, it seemed likely Miller Park would be affected by the flooding that impacted much of city. After all, the ballpark suffered extensive damage after a strong storm a year ago.

Thanks to a recently installed berm between Miller Parkway and the Brewers' staff parking lot, however, the service level at Miller Park was not affected by the storms Thursday night.

According to Brewers spokesman Tyler Barnes, credit goes to the Wisconsin Department of Transportation.

"The DOT, in the spring, really did a phenomenal job building this berm," Barnes said. "They put up a berm to prevent any sort of flooding coming into the south dock.

"The water got up on the berm pretty high, but they nailed it. If this was a once in a five-lifetime rain or whatever they're saying it was, then it did its job."

Last summer, a major rainstorm resulted in damage throughout the service level, which includes the home and visitors' clubhouses as well as batting cages and a media interview room, among other things.

As a result, all the furniture and upholstery in the home clubhouse was required to be replaced -- with temporary replacements last season and more permanent furniture and carpeting prior to the start of this season.

After the storm Thursday, the damage at Miller Park was no different than any other above-average rainstorm.

"Sort of ironically, the service level is bone dry, and then in some of the areas of offices on the field level we had a few areas that got some water in them," Barnes said. "Brewers enterprises, the ticket offices and the administrative office entrance had some water in them.

"I wouldn't call it standing water, it was more of a nuisance. So we're having to make some repairs there, but quite honestly, we've had some water come in there a couple times already this year."

Brewers bussed home from Chicago

MILWAUKEE -- While the Brewers were in Pittsburgh throughout much of Thursday night's storm, they certainly were among those who felt its effects.

Rather than fly as regularly scheduled from Pittsburgh to Milwaukee, the club was forced to fly into Chicago as General Mitchell International Airport was closed due to flooding on the runways.

From there, the Brewers bussed from Chicago to Milwaukee. According to Brewers broadcaster Cory Provus, the team's flight landed in Chicago at 1:30 a.m. CT, while the bus arrived in Milwaukee just before 3 a.m.

"I think I was in bed by 3:30, I'd say," Brewers manager Ken Macha said. "It's no big deal. It's just like playing a night game in Boston and then going to Kansas City."

Worth noting

Veteran reliever LaTroy Hawkins threw 11 pitches for Triple-A Nashville on Thursday night. According to Brewers manager Ken Macha, Hawkins was scheduled to pitch another inning Friday for the "back-to-back days" part of his rehab assignment. ... Left-hander Zach Braddock was unavailable once again for the Brewers on Friday. Macha said that Braddock was undergoing treatment and would likely miss a couple more days. ... This weekend, the Brewers will celebrate their teams of the 1990s. Friday night, they wore reproductions of the Brewers uniforms from 1997-99 while welcoming Greg Vaughn and Jeff Cirillo back as part of the celebration.