ANAHEIM -- Angels ace Jered Weaver will earn $7.365 million this season in the aftermath of the Angels prevailing in an arbitration hearing held on Wednesday. The decision by the arbitrators was announced on Thursday morning.

Weaver, represented by agent Scott Boras, had been seeking $8.8 million. He was paid $4.625 million in 2010, when he made the American League All-Star team for the first time and placed fifth in the AL Cy Young Award balloting.

In a season of disappointment, Weaver, 28, gave the Angels and their fans something to feel good about on a consistent basis in 2010.

Emerging as an unquestioned, bonafide ace with the departure of mentor and good buddy John Lackey, Weaver excelled from April through September.

His 13-12 record was highly deceiving, the product of poor run support. He led the Major Leagues with 233 strikeouts and finished fifth in the AL in ERA (3.01). He tied for third in the AL in innings pitched (224 1/3), was the sixth-toughest pitcher in the league to hit and had the sixth-best WHIP (walks and hits per inning) in the game.

A slender right-hander from Simi Valley, Calif., who emerged as a dominant pitcher at Long Beach State, Weaver flourished on his home turf. His 1.86 home ERA was the best in the league.

"Jered was terrific from start to finish," Angels manager Mike Scioscia said. "The one thing a pitcher can't control is wins and losses. Everything else he could control, Jered controlled. With better offensive support, he could have challenged for the league lead in wins.

"He gave us consistency and pitched at a high level the entire season. He didn't weaken at all, even though he exceeded his career high in innings by a large number. He carried his stuff and his competitiveness throughout the season and kept us in the game almost every time out."

Weaver averaged 9.3 K's per nine innings, third in the AL. His 233 K's represented the highest single-season strikeout total by an Angels pitcher since Nolan Ryan notched 260 in 1978.

In half of his 34 starts, the Halos produced three or fewer runs. Eleven times, they scored two or fewer. Ten times, Weaver went at least seven innings and allowed no more than one run.

"I think, overall, I made some good strides this year," Weaver said. "I never even thought about leading the league in strikeouts; that was something that just happened. My goal coming into the season was to pitch 200 innings, and surpassing my career best [211 in 2009] was very satisfying. It showed that I was able to have consistent command and get deeper in games than in the past.

"It was a disappointing season in a lot of respects. We all are frustrated that we didn't perform better as a team. From a personal standpoint, I was able to achieve some things, but this is a team game. And when your team doesn't win, it's hard to feel too good about things."