PEORIA, Ariz. -- Veteran left-handed reliever George Sherrill again was the only Mariners pitcher to not throw on Wednesday as the club completed its second round of bullpen sessions for the 35 candidates in camp.

Sherrill, who signed a one-year deal as a free agent after pitching for Atlanta last year, likely won't crank it up until full-squad workouts begin this weekend.

"We're going to get him out here in the next 3-4 days," manager Eric Wedge said. "I'm just really aware of the workload he's had and the fact he's a left-hander. With those guys, as a manager you can get them up every night if you want to. So there has to be a certain discipline with how you use those guys, especially with George being a veteran and a guy you know you're going to go to. He knows himself well, so there's no reason to rush that."

Pitching coach Carl Willis noted that Sherrill "fatigued a bit toward the end" of last season and has plenty of time to work himself into shape this spring, with the Mariners being the first Major League team to report by a full week due to their early season opener in Tokyo.

"We're here a long time, so there's no reason to get him started right away," said Willis. "We'll get him going here in the next few days."

Willis said the first four days of camp, which have now seen all the other pitchers throw two bullpen sessions apiece, have gone well.

"It's always an important step, that second bullpen when guys come in," he said. "As much as you tell them not to get too giddy that first time out, they want to show you what they can do and they're excited. But everyone now has gone through two sides and physically they seem to be where they need to be, so we'll keep moving forward."

Kawasaki making good first impression

PEORIA, Ariz. -- While Japanese free-agent pitcher Hisashi Iwakuma has been the focal point of much of the media during the early going at Mariners camp, fellow countryman Munenori Kawasaki continues making a big impression on his new teammates with his outgoing personality and energy as a potential utility infielder.

Kawasaki, an eight-time All-Star shortstop in Japan, signed a Minor League contract with an invitation to camp last month. And while Seattle's position players aren't due in camp until Friday, the 30-year-old was one of the first to arrive in Peoria last week and has been a daily presence during early workouts.

"He's got a lot of energy," Mariners shortstop Brendan Ryan said the first time he took ground balls with Kawasaki. "This could be a lot of fun."

Manager Eric Wedge said those two have a lot in common, even if they speak different languages. Kawasaki talks in Japanese continually while he's fielding grounders or running the basepaths during drills, even if no one around him comprehends a word.

"We're still getting to know him and he's still getting to know us and his teammates, but you love people enjoying the game," Wedge said. "He loves to be out there, very similar to a Brendan Ryan and the energy he brings and how he enjoys being out there. I don't know who is going to get the last word in edge-wise between those two guys, but it'll be a lot of fun to watch."

Do the two actually understand anything the other says?

"I guess through the international talk of baseball, they understand each other," Wedge said with a laugh. "That's probably it."

Catricala to get good look at third base

PEORIA, Ariz. -- Vinnie Catricala, the Mariners' Minor League Player of the Year last season after hitting .349 with 101 runs, 106 RBIs and 25 home runs in Class A and Double-A, was on the field Wednesday for the first time as position players continued to arrive in advance of Friday's official full-squad reporting date.

Catricala, 23, will be worked at both third base and in the outfield, manager Eric Wedge said, in a slight change from earlier indications that the University of Hawaii product would play mostly outfield in his first camp invitation.

"We're going to see a lot of him at third base in regard to reps he's taking," Wedge said. "We're going to take a good look at him there and a good look at him in the outfield as well. We like the way he swings the bat and his size. He has a presence about him that you have to like with any young player.

"It's his first camp with us. We're not going to fast forward anything, but we'll take a good look at him."

Not surprisingly, the 6-foot-3, 230-pound native of Sacramento, Calif., said he's fine with wherever the Mariners want to play him. In three Minor League seasons, Catricala has played 133 games at third, 88 at first and 59 in the outfield.