GLENDALE, Ariz. -- Dodgers starter Aaron Harang was able to throw live batting practice Wednesday despite irritation to his right foot caused by new orthotics.

The Dodgers had some degree of concern, because Harang missed a month last year with the Padres due to a stress reaction to the same foot caused by pitching on a mound with a deep hole dug into it by the opposing pitcher. His current discomfort is with a different part of the foot than last year.

Harang said he was tentative warming up, but he could tell that the pitching motion didn't cause discomfort.

"I don't feel it when I push off the mound, but it's still sensitive with the first explosive step taking off while running," he said. "And the pounding of running gets me."

Harang said he hasn't had an MRI or bone scan yet, because it is responding to ice and conservative treatment. He said he went back to a shoe and orthotic he used last year.

Kershaw stares down big bats in live BP

GLENDALE, Ariz. -- Wednesday was the first day Dodgers starting pitchers threw live batting practice to hitters, and right out of the chute, National League Cy Young Award winner Clayton Kershaw opposed the middle of the starting lineup: Matt Kemp, Andre Ethier and James Loney.

"He was throwing hard. Really hard," NL MVP Award runner-up Kemp said. "They would have me face the Cy Young winner the first day, huh? Guess it can only go uphill from there."

Kershaw has been dealing with mild back tightness that delayed his first bullpen session by two days. But Loney said Kershaw was sharp.

"It was fun," Loney said. "It should get easier after facing him as the first guy."

Kershaw said it was a little strange pitching to his teammates.

"I don't remember facing them before," he said. "Mostly, they were just tracking [not swinging]. It was a little weird. I'll talk to them and get some feedback, see how they thought it looked."

Former Angel Kennedy happy to be a Dodger

GLENDALE, Ariz. -- Adam Kennedy had a unique take on the controversy ignited Tuesday, when manager Don Mattingly said Los Angeles was a Dodgers town.

Kennedy, signed by the Dodgers for a utility role this year, spent seven years playing for the Angels, including their World Series championship season of 2002.

"Without a doubt, it's a great time to be coming to the Dodgers right now," said Kennedy. "They're changing ownership, they have [Clayton] Kershaw, [Matt] Kemp, support-type players. We're right there.

"When I was young [in Riverside], if you were from Southern California, it was the Dodgers and Vin Scully. There wasn't a whole lot of cable, and the one game you had on every night was the Dodgers. That's the California dream, to play for the Dodgers. I know all my friends and family are excited about this."