LOS ANGELES -- Long before they completed Sunday's comeback with a walk-off victory over the Phillies, there was already a good feeling on the Pirates' bench: Pedro Alvarez had arrived in the fifth inning, checking in with a long home run for his first hit of the season.

"Everyone felt better for him," manager Clint Hurdle said. "Everyone is pulling for him, and he knows he has a wealth of support in this clubhouse. There was a lot of excitement when he hit that ball."

Hurdle acknowledges having a fine line to tread with the third baseman.

On one hand, he wants to safeguard Alvarez's confidence by sitting him against the tough left-handers lined up to face the Pirates early this season. Casey McGehee drew the start on Saturday against Cliff Lee, and he again figures to be in the lineup Tuesday night against Clayton Kershaw.

On the other, Hurdle doesn't want Alvarez to develop a platoon mentality by going around him too often -- such as when Matt Hague hit for him in the eighth inning Sunday with Philadelphia lefty Antonio Bastardo on the mound.

"[Hitting for Pedro] is not a layup in my mind," Hurdle said. "You want to give young men opportunities to improve, to let them build some traction. You want to be an optimist, but you need to be a realist. I don't envision Pedro being a guy who gets pinch-hit for a lot in his career. Initially, to help him get his feet on the ground, we'll pick our spots."

"Clint knows if Pedro hits the way he's capable, we'll be a much better offensive ballclub," general manager Neal Huntington said. "The challenge is making sure, by not running him out there against dominant left-handers early, that he doesn't get off to a bad start."

West Coast has not been kind to Pirates

LOS ANGELES -- Rod Barajas has spent more than half of his career at two stops of the road trip the Pirates will begin Tuesday afternoon: In Arizona, and here with the Dodgers.

Now the Bucs' primary catcher, Barajas is about to get the proverbial lesson in how the other half lives. This West Coast swing -- the Pirates will also make a stop in San Francisco -- has not been kind to recent Pittsburgh teams.

As a member of the D-backs (1999-2003) and Dodgers (2010-11), Barajas wondered why East Coast teams, in general, have trouble playing on the Left Coast.

"They come from places where it's humid, and I've heard pitchers complain that their breaking ball just isn't as sharp in the dry air," Barajas said. "But it could be as simple as the time-zone change."

Ballplayers are veteran travelers and always try to adjust. Still, the first pitch for Wednesday night's game will be at 10:10 p.m. ET.

"And we'd always hear about teams getting in at weird times," Barajas said. "But we never felt that we had an unusual advantage over them or that our job would be easier."

Since 2006, the Pirates are 19-42 on the three stops of this trip. They have not won a series in Dodger Stadium since taking two of three on Sept. 19-21, 2006. In the last six years, the Bucs are 6-17 in Los Angeles, 8-11 in San Francisco and 5-14 in Phoenix.

Worth noting

• Neal Huntington had no plans to check out in person Charlie Morton's rehab start for Triple-A Indianapolis on Monday night in Columbus -- but thought he might change his mind if the Clippers had a check waiting for him.

That was the Pirates GM's tongue-in-cheek reference to the fact the Clippers play in new Huntington Park -- which sits on Neil Street.

"I keep waiting for my money. But maybe they're waiting for me to pay," Huntington said.

Well, maybe if they got the spelling of the street right.

• The walk-off wins over the Phillies marked the first time in the live ball (post-1918) era that the Bucs had a pair of walk-offs within the first three games of a season. In 1965, they had two (over the Giants and the Astros, both in 10 innings) within the first four games.

The last word: "Two-out runs are the Holy Grail of this sport."
-- Neil Walker, after the Bucs had scored six of their total of seven runs against the Phillies with two outs.