WSH@ARI: Hill opens the scoring with a solo homer

PHOENIX -- Even before he got to the ballpark Monday, D-backs second baseman Aaron Hill was lobbying to be in the starting lineup.

Hill sent manager Kirk Gibson a text Monday morning, saying his left ankle would not prevent him from playing.

Hill fouled a pitch off his ankle in Sunday's second game and was removed a few innings later.

After Gibson received the text, he talked with head athletic trainer Ken Crenshaw, and the decision was made to keep Hill out until Tuesday.

"All things considered, we're going to give him another day, and he's available [to pinch-hit]," Gibson said. "I'm sure he's going to hit in the cage. And he had a pretty big knot on there. And actually he could play the field OK, but the hitting really bothered him."

Hill entered in the seventh inning Monday as a pinch-hitter and flied out to center field.

Arroyo good to go, shrugs off elbow comment

ARI@NYM: Arroyo allows one run over six

PHOENIX -- D-backs right-hander Bronson Arroyo said his elbow would not prevent him from making his next scheduled start and he was surprised at the attention it received from the media.

Arroyo told manager Kirk Gibson he was spent after six innings in Sunday's first game of a doubleheader and Gibson told the media following the game that Arroyo had a "tender" elbow.

"I don't why Gibby said that about my elbow being banged up," Arroyo said. "I'm banged up all the time. It's not new news. We play this game banged up almost all the time, it's just the way it is. You find a good way to stay healthy, and it's going to entail some drugs and some therapy and some rest. It's just the life of playing 162 games, man."

Arroyo, 37, has never missed a regular-season start in his 15-year career spanning 365 starts, and he has no plans to miss his turn Friday against the Reds.

If he makes 33 starts a year, Arroyo estimated that he feels like he did Sunday around eight times and another eight times he feels great. The rest of the time he feels so-so.

"This is the big leagues, so we're going to go out there sometimes not with our best stuff, not feeling 100 percent, and sometimes you've got to mask that over with treatments and drugs and all kinds of different things," Arroyo said. "And that's just the way I think this game should be played. That's what we get paid for is to go out there and grind it out at any cost."

Gibson remembers father on Memorial Day

SD@ARI: Gibson on all-around win, walk-off

PHOENIX -- D-backs manager Kirk Gibson always thinks of his late father, Robert, on Memorial Day.

Robert Gibson served on the U.S.S Missouri, and it's one of the reasons Gibson demands that his players all be on the top step of the dugout each game for the playing of the national anthem.

"I'm pretty staunch about us standing up on the front step, showing our respects," Gibson said. "We're very fortunate and very grateful that we live in a country like this with people willing to do that. They're doing that to protect our freedom and letting us all do what we do every day. We're fortunate."

Gibson said he hoped that people remember the servicemen and women who were injured while serving and now require care.

"There's great initiative and great conviction in our community and our country to honor these people and help them when they come back, because it messes many of them up," Gibson said. "We should all feel good about that, but we should all, I think on this day, make sure that we remain determined to take care of them. They're taking care of us every day."

D-backs right-hander Josh Collmenter, whose grandfather served in the Air Force and whose brother is currently in the Marine Corps. hung a large American flag from his locker. Something he does on Memorial Day as well as on the Fourth of July.