Clay Buchholz tweaked his left knee running the bases in Atlanta.

ATLANTA -- Clay Buchholz might miss his next scheduled start on Saturday against the Rays not just because of his recent struggles, but also because he tweaked his left knee running the bases in Monday's start against the Braves.

Buchholz met with manager John Farrell, pitching coach Juan Nieves and general manager Ben Cherington before Tuesday's game.

"We met with him a little while ago. We're undetermined with his spot coming up in another four days," Farrell said. "We've got to get through tomorrow's bullpen. After he ran the bases yesterday, there was a pitch where his landing leg gave out. We've got to make sure that he gets through his bullpen tomorrow. We've got to make sure that knee, where he felt was a little hyperextended doesn't persist or show any further soreness. That's where we are right now."

Take away the knee ailment and there still could be some motivation to have Buchholz miss a start or two.

The righty (2-4, 7.02 ERA) has been hit hard in three of his last four starts.

"When A.J. [Pierzynski] went to the mound, he called us out but Clay waved us off, felt like it was not a big issue," Farrell said. "That doesn't lead into the eight walks or anything like that, but we've got to make sure he feels OK once he gets through his bullpen tomorrow to keep going. We're not going to put him at any further risk injury-wise."

The hot, sticky weather also didn't help Buchholz on Monday.

"He lost seven pounds yesterday, which for Clay is almost unheard of. First time he's dealing with the heat and humidity this year," Farrell said. "We're in May, it's not really all that hot [most of the time]. It's different than the weather we've been involved in. That's not going to be used as an excuse, just a condition that everyone's played in."

Buchholz's struggles have been one of the most surprising developments of the season for the Red Sox.

"We haven't made a definitive decision on his next turn through the rotation," Farrell said. "We're not blind to what everyone sees. And yes, there is concern because we're talking about a guy who was potentially on his way to a Cy Young year last year and now he's only showing flashes of it, either inside a given game or for a given start. We continue to search for some consistency of execution of pitches which might lead to added confidence. He's not there yet."

Ross behind plate against former teammates

OAK@BOS: Ross knocks a solo home run to left field

ATLANTA -- The Jon Lester-David Ross battery, which has had stellar results since late last season, was broken up five days ago.

But it was back together Tuesday, as Ross started behind the plate against the Braves, the team he played for from 2009-12.

"Also David's swung the bat well against [Braves starter Aaron] Harang," said Red Sox manager John Farrell. "I think it's pretty fairly documented the history that Jon and David have had, it's been a successful one, not just this year but last year as well. We need that combination to be as effective again."

What makes Ross and Lester click so well together?

"We've created a good relationship coming off of last year and getting to know each other and what he likes to do and knowing his personality and when to talk to him and how to talk to him," Ross said. "I think I've created a lot of trust there. He trusts me. I've enjoyed caching him. He's one of the best lefties in the game. It makes my job really easy."

Lester had thrown to Ross in seven starts this season leading into Tuesday's game, posting a 2.39 ERA.

Ross was also looking forward to playing against his former team.

"A lot of good memories here," Ross said. "A lot of good buddies. I like a lot of the guys around here. Some of my best friends in baseball are from my years here."

'Idiots' back at Fenway for homestand opener

Pedro on Hall of Fame, 2004 World Series

BOSTON -- When the Red Sox open their homestand on Wednesday night against the Braves, there will be a nostalgic feeling during pregame festivities.

This will be the 10-year reunion for the beloved 2004 team, which snapped an 86-year World Series championship drought.

Many of the characters who made up the beloved "idiots" will be on hand, including Manny Ramirez, Johnny Damon, Pedro Martinez, Kevin Millar, Keith Foulke, Derek Lowe, Jason Varitek, Tim Wakefield, Trot Nixon, Gabe Kapler and Orlando Cabrera.

For a refresher course, why did the 2004 team refer to themselves as idiots?

Allow Damon -- who coined the moniker -- to explain.

"Everyone calls themselves an idiot every now and then, but the whole [idiots] thing was just saying that we didn't care what happened to these teams of the past," Damon said.

Lowe is looking forward to seeing some of the teammates he literally hasn't crossed paths with in a decade.

"Some guys, I still haven't seen to this day," said Lowe in an interview last year. "You go from such a close-knit group to getting off the float, and you shake hands and off you go."

Drew moving up to Triple-A Pawtucket

Cherington on bringing back Drew for 2014

ATLANTA -- After a solid three-game stint for Class A Greenville in which he went 3-for-8, Stephen Drew will move up to Triple-A Pawtucket for Tuesday's game.

Drew took Tuesday off, and could return to the Red Sox on June 2 in Cleveland.

He will stay with Pawtucket until he is ready to be in Boston's lineup.

"Seven to nine innings at shortstop tomorrow, followed by a DH, then shortstop again," said manager John Farrell of the plan for Drew. "In talking with him earlier today, he's starting to feel like he's getting his legs underneath him. We can't skip any steps along the way to do that. He's progressed as we had hoped."

The Red Sox re-signed Drew on May 21.