2008 U.S. Olympic Team: Staff Bios

Davey Johnson - Manager

Davey Johnson played 13 seasons in the Major Leagues with Baltimore, Atlanta, Philadelphia and the Chicago Cubs. Johnson made his Major League debut on April 13, 1965, and went on to become a four time MLB All-Star (1968-70, 1973) while playing in four World Series with Baltimore, winning two (1966, 1970).

The three-time gold glove winner also has a career managerial record of 1,148-888 (.564) in 14 Major League seasons as a manager with the New York Mets (1984-90), Cincinnati Reds (1993-95), Baltimore Orioles (1996-97) and Los Angeles Dodgers (1999-2000), taking three of those teams to the post season. In 1986, Johnson's Mets won 108 regular season games and beat the Boston Red Sox to become World Series Champions for the first time since Gil Hodges guided the Mets past the Orioles in the 1969 series, a Baltimore team on which Johnson was the second baseman.

Later, Johnson was named the 1997 American League Manager of the Year after leading the Orioles to the A.L. East Division title.

Inducted into the Orioles Hall of Fame in 1997, Johnson's was one of 10 managers to be placed on the new Veterans Committee ballot for possible induction into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown.

Johnson has been with USA Baseball since 2005, serving as a manager or coach on the following teams:

• Manager - 2005 Professional Team at the IBAF Baseball World Cup in The Netherlands (7th)
• Manager - 2005 Professional Team at the CONCEBE Regional Olympic Qualifying Tournament in Phoenix, Ariz. (gold)
• Bench coach - 2006 Professional Team at the World Baseball Classic (6th)
• Manager - 2006 Professional Team at the Americas Olympic Qualifying Tournament in Cuba (gold)
• Manager - 2007 Professional Team at the IBAF Baseball World Cup in Taiwan (gold)

Marcel Lachemann - Pitching Coach

Marcel Lachemann has been in the Colorado Rockies organization for eight years, five as a special assistant to General Manager Dan O'Dowd. He was the Rockies pitching coach in 2000 and 2001.

This year will mark Lachemann's 40th in professional baseball. Marcel has been a pitching coach for all or parts of 24 seasons, 15 at the Major League level. He was pitching coach for Team USA in the inaugural World Baseball Classic in 2006.

"Lache" came to Colorado from the Angels, where he served for 17 years, including three seasons (1994-96) as the full-time or interim manager of the big-league club. In 1992, he left the Angels to become the first pitching coach in Marlins history, joining his brother Rene who managed the club. The next season, Marcel returned to the Angels and was named manager on May 17, 1994. He went 160-170 in parts of three seasons guiding the then-California Angels, including a second place finish in the A.L. West in 1995. He resigned on Aug. 6, 1996. The Los Angeles native began his coaching career with Montreal, 1973-75, and then worked as an assistant coach at his alma mater, Southern Cal, before joining the Angels in 1982.

Lachemann lettered at USC from 1960-62, helping the Trojans to the 1961 College World Series title. He pitched in parts of three seasons with Oakland (1969-71), going 7-4 with a 3.44 ERA in 70 appearances.

Lachemann has been with USA Baseball since 1999, serving as a coach on the following teams:

• Pitching coach - 1999 Professional Team at the Pan American Games in Winnipeg, Canada (silver, Olympic qualifiers)
• Pitching coach - 2005 Professional Team at the CONCEBE Regional Olympic Qualifying Tournament in Phoenix, Ariz. (gold)
• Pitching coach - 2006 Professional Team at the Americas Olympic Qualifying Tournament in Cuba (gold)
• Pitching coach - 2007 Professional Team at the IBAF Baseball World Cup in Taiwan (gold)

Reggie Smith - Hitting Coach

An ambidextrous, all-state high school football and baseball player from California, Reggie Smith had a tryout with Houston at Dodger Stadium during his senior year but signed with Minnesota as a shortstop in 1963. Left unprotected by the Twins after his first pro season, the strong-armed switch-hitter was drafted by the Red Sox, who made him an outfielder. As a rookie, he helped Boston to the 1967 pennant and homered twice in the World Series. From 1967 through 1973 he batted .300 three times and won a Gold Glove in 1968 when he led American League outfielders in putouts. In 1968 and 1971, he led the AL in doubles.

Traded to St. Louis with Ken Tatum for Rick Wise and Bernie Carbo in October 1973, Smith had two All-Star seasons for the Cardinals in 1974 and 1975. He hit three home runs in a May 22, 1976 game before moving on to the Dodgers in June. On the way to the 1977 NL pennant, Smith, Steve Garvey, Dusty Baker, and Ron Cey became the first four teammates in baseball history to each hit 30 or more home runs in a season; Smith hit a career-high 32. He was a major factor in the Dodgers' 1978 NL pennant, hitting a club-high 29 home runs, and adding three homers in the World Series loss to New York. Smith batted .284 as a Giants first baseman in 1982 before signing to play in Japan.

Smith owns and operates the Reggie Smith Baseball Centers in Los Angeles and the Lakeland Baseball Academy in Florida. Smith has been with USA Baseball since 1999, serving as a coach on the following teams:

• Hitting coach - 1999 Professional Team at the Pan American Games in Winnipeg, Canada (silver, Olympic qualifiers)
• Hitting coach - 2000 Professional Team at the Sydney Olympic Games (gold)
• Hitting coach - 2006 Professional Team at the World Baseball Classic (6th)
• Hitting coach - 2006 Professional Team at the Americas Olympic Qualifying Tournament in Cuba (gold)
• Hitting coach - 2007 Professional Team at the IBAF Baseball World Cup in Taiwan (gold)

Rick Eckstein - Bench Coach

Rick Eckstein coached at the University of Florida from 1996-1998 before joining the then-Tampa Bay Devil Rays organization in 1999 as the bullpen catcher and batting practice pitcher. In the spring of 2000, Eckstein served as the assistant coach at Seminole Community College, then joined the staff of the Minnesota Twins as the bullpen catcher/strength and conditioning coach through the 2001 season at both the major and minor league levels. From 2002-03 Eckstein was the assistant coach at the University of Georgia. After the 2002 season Rick joined younger brother, 2006 World Series MVP David Eckstein on the Japan All-Star Tour where he served as the team's bullpen catcher.

From 2004-06 Eckstein joined the Montreal Expos as a Minor League hitting coach and also served as the bullpen catcher for the National League All-Star team in Detroit. Eckstein served as the hitting coach for the AAA Memphis Redbirds in 2007.

Eckstein has been with USA Baseball since 2005, serving as a coach on the following teams:

• Bench/Third base coach - 2005 Professional Team at the IBAF Baseball World Cup in The Netherlands (7th)
• Bench/Third base coach - 2005 Professional Team at the CONCEBE Regional Olympic Qualifying Tournament in Phoenix, Ariz. (gold)
• Bullpen coach - 2006 Professional Team at the World Baseball Classic (6th)
• Bench/Third base coach - 2006 Professional Team at the Americas Olympic Qualifying Tournament in Cuba (gold)
• Bench/Third base coach - 2007 Professional Team at the IBAF Baseball World Cup in Taiwan (gold)

Dick Cooke - Auxiliary Coach

Dick Cooke graduated from the University of Richmond in 1978 as a three-year letterman in baseball. Cooke was a left-handed pitcher in the Boston Red Sox organization from 1979-82.

He became the assistant baseball coach at Richmond from 1984-88 then served as the head coach at Belmont Abbey College (N.C.) from 1989-90. He currently is in his 18th season as the head coach at Davidson College (N.C.) (1991-present).

Cooke has been with USA Baseball since 1999, serving as a coach on the following teams:

• Auxiliary coach - 1999 Professional Team at the Pan American Games in Winnipeg, Canada (silver, Olympic qualifiers)
• Auxiliary coach - 2000 Professional National Team at the Sydney Olympic Games (gold)
• Pitching coach - 2003 National (Collegiate) Team (27-2; team record for shutouts - 13 - and ERA; silver at the 2003 Pan American Games in the Dominican Republic)
• Auxiliary coach - 2003 Professional National Team at the Americas Olympic Qualifying Tournament in Panama (bronze)
• Auxiliary coach - 2006 Professional Team at the Americas Olympic Qualifying Tournament in Cuba (gold)
• Auxiliary coach - 2007 Professional Team at the IBAF Baseball World Cup in Taiwan (gold)

Rolando de Armas - Auxiliary Coach

Rolando "Roly" de Armas was born in New York, N.Y. and currently resides in Palm Harbor, Fla. A former catcher, de Armas played five years of pro ball in the Phillies organization from 1973-77. He was player-coach at Peninsula (A) in 1977, coached at Peninsula in 1978, and managed Helena (A) from 1979-82, Spartanburg (A) in 1983 and 1985-86, Sarasota (A) in 1984, Clearwater (A) in 1987 and 1993 and Martinsville (A) 1988-92.

De Armas was the bullpen catcher for the White Sox before being named bullpen coach in 1995, a position he held through the 1996 season. He managed the Gulf Coast White Sox (R) in 1997 and South Bend (A) in the Arizona system in 1998. He remained in Arizona's farm system in 1999 as catching coordinator and Tucson Rookie League manager.

De Armas returned to the Major Leagues in 2000 as bullpen coach for Jim Fregosi's Toronto Blue Jays and returned to the Phillies organization in 2000 to manage the Gulf Coast Phillies (R). He managed Clearwater during the second half in 2002 and all of 2003 prior to returning to the Gulf Coast team in 2004. He was the catching coordinator there for two seasons (2005-06) before returning to manage the Gulf Coast team in 2007.

De Armas has been with USA Baseball since 2006, serving as a coach on the following teams:

• Auxiliary coach - 2006 Professional Team at the Americas Olympic Qualifying Tournament in Cuba (gold)
• Auxiliary coach - 2007 Professional Team at the IBAF Baseball World Cup in Taiwan (gold)

Bob Watson - General Manager of Professional Baseball Operations

Bob Watson was named Major League Baseball's Vice President of On-Field Operations on February 21, 2002. In his capacity he oversees player discipline, pace of game, uniform policy, stadium configuration and other on-field matters.

As a player, Watson was a two-time All-Star (1973 and 1975) in his 19 Major League seasons with the Houston Astros (1966-79), the Boston Red Sox (1979), the New York Yankees (1980-82) and the Atlanta Braves (1982-84). He was a career .295 hitter with 184 home runs and 989 runs batted in. Playing for the Yankees in the 1981 World Series, Watson batted .318 (7-22) with a pair of home runs and seven RBI in the six-game Fall Classic. On May 4, 1975, Watson scored the 1,000,000th run in Major League Baseball history.

After retiring in 1984, Watson worked for the Oakland Athletics as a roving hitting instructor (1985), hitting coach (1986-87) and bench coach (1988) before returning to the Astros as assistant general manager in November 1988. In 1993, Watson became the first African-American with the title of general manager in Major League history when the Astros promoted him. Following the 1995 season, he was named the general manager of the New York Yankees, and in 1996, his first full season, Watson became the first African-American general manager of a World Series Championship club. He served as general manager of the Yankees until February 1998.

In 2005, USA Baseball, the national governing body of amateur baseball in the United States, named Watson as its general manager of professional baseball operations for the 2005-08 quadrennium. Watson will oversee the selection of the USA Baseball professional coaching staffs and players through 2008 as well as the team's competitive preparations, including training and exhibition games.

Born April 10, 1946, in Los Angeles, Watson currently splits his time between New York and Houston.