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World Series 2001
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10/22/2001 12:42 AM ET
Inning-by-inning rundown of Game 5 of the NLCS
By Dinn Mann
MLB.com
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Pregame
Two games in one night at the same time. This will be interesting. In the true spirit of 21st century multitasking and maximizing resources, yours truly will attempt to provide inning-by-inning details of each team's at-bats from both Atlanta and New York. All of this is possible because of the footage supplied by our friends at FOX. One of the many worries going into this experiment is that my eyes will become permanently damaged like Navin R. Johnson's did thanks to optigrab, the invention that took Steve Martin's character from rags to riches to rags in "The Jerk." Let's hope not. It's worth whatever risk, really, because both games are can't-miss matchups. Here in the MLB.com media room, we'll take full advantage of audio feeds (as you can through our bargain-basement subscription option) from the respective announcing crews that have covered these teams all season. We'll watch pitch-by-pitch updates on Gameday, our in-game account that springs to life through the wonders of technology and real-live humans in the press boxes. How effective will Roger Clemens be? Did Seattle dial M for Momentum in Game 3? Is Randy Johnson, coming off that awful seven-game postseason losing streak, about to go streaking in the positive direction? Will Atlanta play errorless baseball and send the series back to the desert? As Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons would say, "Oh What A Night." On the left of this page, you'll get a description every three outs of what just happened in the National League. On the right, you'll get every-three-outs details of the American League story as it unfolds at Yankee Stadium. Here we go. If attempting this is anything like "beer, then liquor, never sicker," we're in for a bit of a headache in the morning. Here's a toast to the effort here being less-frustrating than picture-in-picture viewing on TV. And now, without further delay, it's time to Take Me (and you) Out To The Ballgame(s).

NLCS

Durazo's two-run HR: 56k | 300k
Julio Franco's HR: 56k | 300k
Bautista's RBI: 56k | 300k

Top 1
Randy Johnson, the Arizona left-hander vs. Tom Glavine, the South's best Southpaw. Glavine starts Tony Womack with a strike. But Womack gets an opposite-field single to left a few moments later. The next batter, nemesis Craig Counsell, delivers a nice sacrifice bunt. Glavine thinks about throwing to second, but, perhaps with flashbacks of Saturday's defensive fiasco in his head, he gets the sure out at first. One down. Luis Gonzalez swings under a Glavine fastball, missing for a 1-2 count. The next pitch, a beautiful one on the upper inside-corner is a called third strike, as it should have been. Two outs. Reggie Sanders bats. The count goes to 3-2. Here's the payoff delivery: ball four, with Mark Grace in the on-deck circle. The count goes to 2-2, with runners on first and second. Grace has a decent at-bat to this point, hanging in against Glavine, fouling off some good offers. But the threat is soon over on a routine roller to second. Grace is thrown out at first.
Diamondbacks 0, Braves on deck

Bottom 1
Marcus Giles tries to get things started against Randy Johnson, No. 51 for the Diamondbacks. The count goes full. Giles fouls off two pitches, the first of which would have been ball four. Giles pops out to Mark Grace in fair territory but on the infield grass. One down. Julio Franco, the first baseman, bats second. He grounds out to shortstop Tony Womack, who throws terribly low. But the skipping zinger is handled by Grace for the out. That brings up Chipper Jones. The Atlanta third baseman, exasperated, is called out on strikes. That's the first K for Johnson, the man with the most strikeouts in the Majors this season. Diamondbacks 0, Braves 0

Top 2
The inning begins with a flyout to right by Matt Williams. Danny Bautista, playing instead of Steve Finley against the left-hander Tom Glavine, grounds out to Glavine. Damian Miller, with nobody on and two away, lines a single to right-center. That brings up Randy Johnson, who doesn't figure to extend things base on his swing at a 1-0 pitch. Just as suspected, Johnson is fanned on a swing and a miss. Diamondbacks 0, Braves 0

Bottom 2
Brian Jordan crushes a Randy Johnson pitch, getting a little too far under it, and flying out to deep left. Andruw Jones strikes out swinging, an ugly at-bat against Johnson, who tends to force that sort of thing. Javy Lopez is up third. He sends a high chopper toward Matt Williams at third, and the ex-Giant, positioned on the outfield grass as the ball comes down, delivers a throw that can't make it across the diamond in the air. But Mark Grace is there, once again, to spare Arizona a throwing error. The Braves are out, 1-2-3.
Diamondbacks 0, Braves 0

Top 3
Tony Womack bats for the second time against Tom Glavine. It looks like a lousy call as Womack is called out on a grounder fielded by Marcus Giles. That is, it looked lousy at full speed. In slow motion, the umpire indeed is confirmed to have made the correct call. The men in blue have gotta like it when that happens. Craig Counsell hits next. Rey Sanchez throws him out after fielding a hard-hit grounder to his side. The adventure with Sanchez on Saturday was on his throws. Not here. Two outs. Luis Gonzalez grounds out, second to first, on a casual and they'll-tease-you-on-the-playground-for-that throw by Giles.
Diamondbacks 0, Braves 0

Bottom 3
Bernard Gilkey bats first for the Braves. He strikes out swinging. Rey Sanchez, however, gets a better result, ripping a liner to left for a single on an off-speed pitch. One perhaps unnecessary observation, FOX is using a speed gun on the screen in the NL park. It is not in the AL. The speed of Roger Clemens' pitches would be interesting to see. The speed of Paul Abbott's pitches in that contest, on the other hand, might not register. But, I digress. Tom Glavine bunts foul for a third strike, and Sanchez is still at first. Two outs. The foul out was nicely guaranteed by third baseman Matt Williams, who had a chance to catch the ball but realized a play was unnecessary on two strikes. Marcus Giles makes the final out, a grounder to his counterpart at second.
Diamondbacks 0, Braves 0

Top 4
It's 2-2 to Reggie Sanders, who hits a harmless fly ball that's hauled in by right fielder Brian Jordan of the Braves. First baseman Mark Grace slaps an opposite-field single to left. Matt Williams is up now. He faces a full count against Tom Glavine. Walk. Danny Bautista has the one-out opportunity. Glavine has a one-out jam. So what does he do? He falls behind, 3-0. Bautista drives a single to center on 3-1, giving Arizona the lead. Did somebody say World Series tickets back in Phoenix? It's 1-0 Diamondbacks with runners on first and second. Damian Miller is the batter. A 1-2 pitch from Glavine is low and inside but catchable for Javy Lopez. Instead, the ball zips to the backstop behind Lopez, and both runners move up. It's 2-2 with one out, and weak-hitting pitcher Randy Johnson (no offense, big guy) is on deck. After Johnson due up for Arizona is left-handed-leadoff-man Tony Womack. The next two pitches are not close, and the bases are loaded for Johnson. Quickly, the count is 1-2, and Johnson fouls one off, then examines his bat. On 1-2 again, Johnson hits a nubber out in front of the plate. Glavine hustles in, barehanding the ball, and flips to Lopez for the force. Glavine escapes damage with a sigh-of-relief out to left on a hard-hit liner off the bat of Womack.
Diamondbacks 1, Braves 0

Bottom 4
Ahh. Two commercials at once. Rest for fingers that are typing about two games. Who would have predicted a shutout in the AL, not the NL, by this point. Just as that's written, Seattle gets a leadoff single in the fourth. For details on that, look to the right on this page. Thank you. Julio Franco bats on this side of the computer screen for the Braves. Indeed he does bat. Franco goes the other way, belting a home run off the top of the fence near the 390 sign, and there is much rejoicing in the nearby Atlanta bullpen. Tie game. Chipper Jones is up. Randy Johnson is not happy. He takes it out on Jones, recording his fifth strikeout of the game, this one swinging. Johnson curses on the mound, nothing too foul, still thinking about Franco's shot. Brian Jordan gets the same result, a swinging K. Ending the inning, Andruw Jones pops out to Mark Grace at first. Nevertheless, the Braves have gotten even.
Diamondbacks 1, Braves 1

Top 5
This is better than the dot races, better than the sausage races. In both games, simulstardom is happening for all the pitchers. Which one will crack first? In this game, Tom Glavine goes up against the 2-3-4 hitters for Arizona. And, uh-oh, the Braves go shopping at The Gaffe again, with Marcus Giles having a grounder carom off the heal of his glove. The play would have been a good one, but it's a play he should have made. E4. Craig Counsell is on first with nobody out, and he's a fast runner. Julio Franco, following up his home run, shows the Atlanta defense how it's done, getting the lead runner on a slow grounder off the bat of Gonzo. One down. Glavine soon gets the second out, a swinging K by Reggie Sanders. Erubiel Durazo is the first pinch-hitter of the night, batting for Mark Grace, who has a tight hamstring (according to one of our reporters in the press box). The pinch-hit appearance is huge, it turns out, with an opposite-field home run -- an inspiring inside-out swing that sends Glavine's offer to the seats (too many of them empty). Matt Williams is the next batter. He is sent searching for his glove after a flyout to center, caught non-challantly by Andruw Jones.
Diamondbacks 3, Braves 1

Bottom 5
Steve Karsay is shown getting loose in the Atlanta bullpen. Randy Johnson is shown getting loss for the home team. He gets an end-of-the-bat groundout to the mound by Javy Lopez to start the bottom of the fifth. Bernard Gilkey is next, with Johnson seeming to smell a Series berth. His next pitch snaps Gilkey's bat. But Gilkey gets the positive result, a falling single to center. Rey Sanchez bats now, and the complexion of the game changes just like that. Sanchez smokes a grounder to third; it kicks off third baseman Matt Williams' right foot (an Atlanta-like error), going straight over to shortstop Mark McLemore. It's first and second, one down. The situation is too juicy for the Braves to send up pitcher Tom Glavine as the man with a bat against Randy Johnson. So, Glavine is removed from the game. The pinch-hitter is Mark DeRosa. His pinch-hit at-bat, let's just say, is far less productive than that of the D-Backs' Erubiel Durazo. DeRosa flies out to center, the hard-earned out recorded on a scrambling, falling-forward catch by Danny Bautista. Two outs. The Braves, due some good luck, get it on a little roller past the mound and toward the second baseman. There's no play. The bases are loaded. Johnson is staring at a bases-loaded, two-out encounter against Julio Franco. The same Franco tattooed a home run to right in his last at-bat. Johnson falls behind, 2 and 0. Energy is high. Not anymore, though, after a hard groundout to short by Franco, a feel-good story anyway.
Diamondbacks 3, Braves 1

Top 6
The Diamondbacks don't up much more fight here, going up against Steve Karsay and subconsciously perhaps sitting on a slim two-run lead for Randy Johnson. Danny Bautista strikes out looking. Damian Miller grounds out to third. Johnson taps out to third as well.
Diamondbacks 3, Braves 1

Bottom 6
Chipper Jones, a strikeout victim in each of his first two at-bats, this time delivers a rip to right. It's an improvement for him against Randy Johnson, but it's an out. One away. Brian Jordan reaches on an infield single (the grounder was hit to the hole between short and third, fielded but bobbled deep in that space by Tony Womack). Andruw Jones interrupts the enthusiasm with a three-strikes, three-swings-and-misses appearance. It's up to Javy Lopez. On one pitch, he's the third out (a flyout to right-center).
Diamondbacks 3, Braves 1

Top 7
Steve Karsay is keeping the Braves in this thing, showing right (field) stuff. He gets Tony Womack on a shallow fly to right. He gets Craig Counsell on a fly to right as well. It's 0-1 to Luis Gonzalez, and looky here, Rey Sanchez makes a superb attempt to throw out the Arizona left fielder. Gonzalez is safe on the play, a hard roller deep in the hole between short and third. Reggie Sanders is retired on the next pitch, a ball he flies to -- yes -- right along the foul line.
Diamondbacks 3, Braves 1

Bottom 7
Bernard Gilkey pops out to right-center, and Randy Johnson is eight men out away from easily the biggest victory of his career (and yes, it is remembered that he once beat the Angels to give Seattle its first AL West crown). Atlanta gets a one-out single by Rey Sanchez to center. B.J. Surhoff pinch-hits for relief pitcher Steve Karsay, blistering a liner to right, where Reggie Sanders lunges forward for a nifty catch in the heel of his glove. Two outs. That brings sparkplug second baseman Marcus Giles to the plate. He earns a walk. Johnson has to dig in against Julio Franco, the closest thing to a Mr. Clutch the Braves have tonight. Dramatically, Franco makes it a one-run game with a clean RBI single to center. Next it's Johnson vs. Chipper Jones. The count goes to 1 and 2. Braves fans chant, a steady but faint sound as Jones fouls one back. Five pitches later (two fouled away), and Jones walks, loading the bases for Brian Jordan, a Met masher this year in tense situations like this. On 1 and 1, Jordan swings and misses at a 96 mph pitch that looks up and away. It's 1-2, and there's no margin for error for Johnson. He concentrates fiercely as he looks to the catcher, Damian Miller. Jordan steps out of the box. Falling as he follows through, Jordan pumps a fastball that's ruled just inside. Tough call for Johnson to stomach. So how does he respond? With a cruel slider, a pitch that's impossible to hit but, coming off his hand, appears meaty. Jordan swings and misses. Inning over.
Diamondbacks 3, Braves 2

Top 8
Erubiel Durazo, the hero in the game to this point, now has the privilege of facing John Smoltz. That's sarcasm. Smoltz, the converted starter coming off rotator-cuff surgery, has been absolutely unhittable this postseason. He coaxes Durazo into a flyout to right. Matt Williams goes to the same location, a little deeper, and also is retired (running catch, back to the infield, by Brian Jordan). Danny Bautista, on 1-2, takes a pitch and appears willing to accept a called strike three. But no, it's not quite in the zone. No problem for Smoltz, who gets Bautista to bounce a little roller to short. Rey Sanchez makes a quality, charging play, throwing out Bautista and bringing Atlanta's bats back into the picture. Normally, three words ending in ing in the same sentence is ill-advised. Please forgive. Both sides of the brain are occupied with two tight games going on.
Diamondbacks 3, Braves 2

Bottom 8
Who am I? Why am I here? This see-saw viewing has created a few seconds of silliness, a reference to the vice presidential-debate history. Who is he? Why is he there? Those are the questions asked when Byung-Hyun Kim enters a game for Randy Johnson. RANDY JOHNSON! A 22-year-old closer is in the game with six outs to go. It's a potential NLCS-clinching burden he carries. It's a ONE-RUN GAME! And, huge kudos to him, he carries it well. Kim gets Andruw Jones on a simple popout to first. He gets Javy Lopez on a popper that second baseman Craig Counsell catches up with on an over-the-shoulder grab in right. Dave Martinez, batting for Bernard Gilkey, completes the 1-2-3 inning on a popout to third.
Diamondbacks 3, Braves 2

Top 9
The Diamondbacks go down at the speed of light. Apparently, they can't wait to get to the ninth with a slim lead. Damian Miller grounds out to John Smoltz. Steve Finley, part of an earlier double switch in which Byung-Hyun Kim entered, lines out to right. What's your hurry, guys? Tony Womack flies out to left. Fine, don't answer.
Diamondbacks 3, Braves 2

Bottom 9
Byung-Hyun Kim is on in the pressure-cooker situation. Atlanta has won 10 consecutive division titles. Count 'em. Ten. Byung-Hyun Kim wasn't even a teen-ager yet when that run began. Yet here he is, poised to send Arizona -- a fourth-year expansion team -- to the World Series. Rey Sanchez strikes out looking. Keith Lockhart, batting for John Smoltz, walks. This is getting scary for the Snakes. Marcus Giles, a pesky hitter, is next. Kim strikes him out swinging. That herky-jerky motion is paying off big. Kim Kong. Julio Franco, the Braves' best hope, is in the batter's box. Kim wins. The Diamondbacks win. It's a flyball to center, an easy, euphoric play for Steve Finley -- who played in a World Series with Padres. The celebration begins. On the other screen, Bernie Williams has hit a game-tying home run for the Yankees. That game is tied. In Arizona, they're saying, bring 'em on. Yankees. Mariners. Doesn't matter. The D-Backs will have their starting rotation just the way they want it. In Georgia, the lights go out. Atlanta has had awesome success. But only '95 produced the ultimate rings.
Diamondbacks 3, Braves 2
Final: Diamondbacks 3, Braves 2
NLCS Final: Diamondbacks 4, Braves 1

ALCS

Top 1
Roger Clemens of the Yankees, seen tossing a football in the outfield before the game, perhaps was inspired by the performance of his alma mater (Texas) in a dominant display against Colorado on Saturday. Clemens trots to the hill. The AL game is more than two batters behind the NL one. Whether Clemens' hamstring is truly OK is the big question. Ichiro Suzuki, as always, leads off. He's hitting .300 in the series. He fouls off three 1-2 pitches before getting called out on an attempted checked swing at a Clemens fireball in the dirt. One out. Mark McLemore is up next. On a 2-1 count, the Seattle shortstop grounds out to his counterpart, Derek Jeter. Two gone. Bret Boone stands in the box now. He misses badly on a rising fastball for the strikeout.
Mariners 0, Yankees on deck

Bottom 1
Chuck Knoblauch is the leadoff hitter against Paul Abbott. The Mariners scored 7.8 runs per game for Abbott this year, which explains his 17 victories against just four defeats. Knoblauch is called out on strikes (a breaking pitch near the inside corner). Roger Clemens, by the way, was second in run support with a figure of 6.6 per game. Derek Jeter flies out to left, a ball five steps shy of the track and caught by Stan Javier. David Justice is the No. 3 hitter for New York tonight. Justice grounds out to the first baseman, John Olerud, who flips to Abbott to retire the side.
Mariners 0, Yankees 0

Top 2
Edgar Martinez earns a walk to start the second, taking a low, outside 3-2 offer from Roger Clemens. The next batter, John Olerud, is greeted with a 3-1 count. He swings at the next next offer, grounding a slow roller to Alfonso Soriano. The out is recorded at second, thanks to Martinez's lack of speed, on a nice play from way over toward first by the second baseman. Stan Javier becomes Clemens' third strikeout victim, swinging and missing at a heater near the upper, outside part of the plate. Mike Cameron bats with Olerud on first. What looked like trouble is now a two-out situation that appears to be in the home team's favor. The count is 2-2 on Cameron. Then 3-2. Then there's ball four, a low call that Clemens doesn't get. Clemens' clenches his lips together but accepts the call without a glare. He concentrates on the next batter, catcher Tom Lampkin. Wise choice by Clemens, who gets Lampkin to chase a low-away offering for strike three.
Mariners 0, Yankees 0

Bottom 2
Bernie Williams tries to get something started, drawing a leadoff walk. Lou Piniella smacks away on his bubble gum in the dugout. He has to like what he sees next. Williams is gunned down at second, trying to steal. He's out despite the pitch being a slow curve. Mark McLemore made a sweeping tag after Tom Lampkin's fine throw. Tino Martinez follows that by grounding out easily to John Olerud at first. Two down. And surprise, surprise, the NL game is moving more quickly than the AL game. They're in the bottom of the third at Turner Field. Jorge Posada draws a two-out walk. He tries to advance on a ball in the dirt but is caught at second, giving Lampkin two assists.
Mariners 0, Yankees 0

Top 3
David Bell leads off the inninng for Seattle. On a 1-2 pitch, Roger Clemens sticks a fork(ball) in Bell, striking out the third baseman swinging. On 3-1 to Ichiro, Clemens gets a called strike on the high-away borderline. The next pitch is ball four. Ichiro is on first, a distraction to Clemens, who works on his pickoff move five times before throwing -- you guessed it -- a pitchout on 0-1 to the versatile Mark McLemore. Next delivery: ball two. On ball three, Ichiro steals second easily. Man, that guy is fast. McLemore grounds out to Clemens; Ichiro is at second with Bret Boone batting. Clemens falls behind, 3 and 0. Ball four is downright ugly, up and in and toward Boone's face. Boone hits the deck, and the ball gets away from Jorge Posada, a wild pitch to be sure. It's first and third, nobody out. Edgar Martinez is the batter. He, the cleanup hitter, has a grand total of zero RBIs in the series. Clemens gets him on a foul pop to the catcher, Posada, in foul territory. The Mariners have yet to hit a ball out of the infield -- not counting the area behind home.
Mariners 0, Yankees 0

Bottom 3
Paul O'Neill is the first hitter in the home half of the inning, getting a 2-0 count. Then, the third pitch is up toward O'Neill's head. He overreacts to the delivery. Any teammate of Roger Clemens' shouldn't be surprised at the technique. It's called pitching. O'Neill gets the last laugh, a walk. Scott Brosius bunts poorly right back to the pitcher but manages to get O'Neill to second. One out. Alfonso Soriano walks on a 3-2 pitch. Chuck Knoblauch pops out to first baseman John Olerud, moving in a couple of steps on the first-base path. Two outs, and Derek Jeter has the two-on, two-out moment. He grounds out to Edgar Martinez, who makes a slightly high throw across the diamond in time for out No. 3.
Mariners 0, Yankees 0

Top 4
John Olerud spanks a single to center. (Not to be outdone in the other game, Julio Franco smacks an opposite-field homer for Atlanta at this very moment). Roger Clemens shuts down any thoughts of a big Seattle inning, though, with a strikeout (swinging) of Stan Javier. Mike Cameron flies into the second out, a hard-hit fly to left that looks more dangerous off the bat than it does in Chuck Knoblauch's glove (caught well short of the track). The count goes full to Tom Lampkin, the Seattle catcher this night. He bloops a fly toward center, and Bernie Williams makes the catch easily. That's five runners stranded by Seattle.
Mariners 0, Yankees 0

Bottom 4
David Justice flies out to left, where Stan Javier adds some excitement to an otherwise routine out, stabbing at the wind-blown ball at the last moment. Bernie Williams bats next, getting a 2-2 count. Two pitches later, ball four is way out of the zone, heading toward the executive-seating location and beyond catcher Damian Miller's mitt. The Seattle pitcher, Paul Abbott, outside of that, has not pitched at all like a Costello. He gets an 0-2 count to Tino Martinez with one out. Martinez whiffs, way ahead on a swing at a change-up on the outside part of the plate. Two away. Jorge Posada earns a ticket to first base via the walk, Abbott's sixth on a night when he's putting up zeroes in other key categories. Paul O'Neill is the New York hope with two on and two out. The count goes to 1 and 2. O'Neill grounds out quietly to John Olerud at first.
Mariners 0, Yankees 0

Top 5
David Bell lines out to third for a fast out. Ichiro Suzuki is next against Roger Clemens. And these are at-bats that simply should not be missed. The NL game is ignored for a little bit. Ichiro strikes out swinging. The third out is Mark McLemore, a loud out on a smash to right that's caught by Paul O'Neill at the warning track.
Mariners 0, Yankees 0

Bottom 5
Scott Brosius is retired quietly on an excuse-me swing that doinks the ball to pitcher Paul Abbott. Next, Alfonso Soriano walks, a somewhat rare feat for the free-swinging second baseman. But not a rare thing against Abbott at all tonight. It's his seventh walk. But then, when you've yet to surrender a hit, you can get away with a little wildness. It's 2-2 with one out to Chuck Knoblauch. Soriano steals second on a pitch in the dirt; he's called safe, though, the ruling could have gone either way. Tom Lampkin threw a seed to second, with Bret Boone applying a terrific tag. Boone disagrees; so does anybody from the Pacific Northwest and the entire cast from Frasier. Knoblauch walks, BB No. 8 for the Yankees. Abbott is one walk away from tying Mike Cuellar's record (a dubious one) for walks in an ALCS game. Derek Jeter works toward a 2-2 count. Abbott wins this head-to-head meeting. Jeter flies out to right, a routine catch made by Ichiro. The same count, 2-2, stares David Justice in the face with two down. Justice grounds out to second, a no-problem play for Bret Boone. People, we have a thing that's not supposed to be talked about going on here. And a shutout for both sides.
Mariners 0, Yankees 0

Top 6
Two quick-and-dirty outs are recorded by Ramiro Mendoza, making a relief appearance for Roger Clemens (who'd thrown 89 pitches and has been bothered by a hamstring this month). The first two outs: Bret Boone (grounder to short) and Edgar Martinez (grounder to third). John Olerud fares no better. In fact, he fares worse, striking out swinging on a 2-2 pitch.
Mariners 0, Yankees 0

Bottom 6
News flash. Paul Abbott is out of the game, having delivered 97 pitches. He deserves a tip of the cap, a click of the mouse, something. The Yankees are blank in the category between runs and errors on the scoreboard. Norm Charlton is the new pitcher. His first challenge, Bernie Williams, brings a deep drive to center. It's an out, albeit a scary one. Next up is Tino Martinez. Can you say one-hitter? Martinez lifts an opposite-field, ground-rule double down the line in left. He's standing on second as Charlton is instructed to walk Jorge Posada. The fourth wide one will be Charlton's last pitch. He is replaced by Jeff Nelson, the ex-Yankee, who has been summoned after the announcement of Shane Spencer as pinch-hitter for Paul O'Neill. Rallys are going on in both games, both by the home teams. The Braves' situation is less ominous (against Randy Johnson in the seventh). Warm-ups and commercial over, we're back. Nelson isn't on top of his game for the first batter, Spencer, who walks on six pitches. Scott Brosius, on 0-1, is ruled to have barely checked his swing (though, Lou Piniella clearly disagrees) on the second pitch (which was oh-so-close even without the non-swing judgment). Scott Brosius bats. He grounds into the tailor-made 4-6-3 double play, executed easily. And wouldn't you know it? Down in Atlanta, the Braves have cut it to a one-run deficit and continue to bat.
Mariners 0, Yankees 0

Top 7
Stan Javier grounds out (short to first), a close call but an accurate one. Mike Cameron becomes a strikeout victim (looking), Ramiro Mendoza's second K in relief of Roger Clemens. Tom Lampkin walks. Next, with a 2-2 count on third baseman David Bell, Mendoza gets a soft liner right back to the mound. The standing fans at Yankee Stadium are pumped.
Mariners 0, Yankees 0

Bottom 7
First up is Alfonso Soriano. He strikes out swinging on an impressive Jeff Nelson slider. Chuck Knoblauch has an extended at-bat. It ends to the satisfaction of Seattle fans with a groundout to third. Two outs. Two-two count to Derek Jeter. Neither team has bupkus on the scoreboard. Nelson keeps it that way, striking Jeter out (swinging) with another of his patented sliders. Mariners doo-dah, Yankees zippo.
Mariners 0, Yankees 0

Top 8
Ichiro Suzuki, 0-for-the-game, grounds out to Derek Jeter. Mark McLemore is retired on a hot-shot play by Alfonso Soriano at second. Ramiro Mendoza is still in the game, looking marvelous. Bret Boone wants to change all that. Already, he's changed the series with a soft-but-significant double in Game 3. His Game 4 statement is bigger. There it goes. Boone has banged a fierce fly toward left center. Chuck Knoblauch runs back to the wall. He's out of room. Boone has eliminated the blank on the run column and given Seattle a lead. Edgar Martinez follows that up with a swinging strikeout. Damage done.
Mariners 1, Yankees 0

Bottom 8
David Justice strikes out looking on three pitches. The one-out situation puts the spotlight on Bernie Williams, as big a postseason hitter as the Yankees have. And he's done it again. Against hard-throwing Arthur Rhodes, Williams smashes a game-tying home run about 10 rows deep beyond the fence in right. All Ichiro can do is watch. All the Yankees can do is whoop it up. For a while. The next batter, Tino Martinez, lines out to first. Jorge Posada hits a hard grounder into the hole between short and third. Not far enough between. David Bell, the third baseman, makes a gigantic diving stop, throwing out Posada to end the New York at-bat.
Mariners 1, Yankees 1

Top 9
Mariano Rivera is the New York nightmare on the mound to try scaring Seattle. All it will take is three pitches. One pitch. John Olerud is out on a 3-1 putout. Another pitch. Stan Javier bunts toward second, and Alfonso Soriano makes a perfect play to field it, throw it and get the out at first. Another pitch, the third out of Rivera's hand, results in a popout to first by Mike Cameron.
Mariners 1, Yankees 1

Bottom 9
Kazuhiro Sasaki is the Mariners' version of Mariano Rivera. He's in now. The first batter, Shane Spencer, grounds out to third. One quick out. It's as if he's saying: Take that, Rivera. The next batter, Scott Brosius, clobbers a pitch up the middle. It's fielded, fantastically, by a diving Mark McLemore at short. He gets to his feet and throws a bit up the first-base line. Brosius is safe. It's a hit. No question. Second baseman Alfonso Soriano is up. He's coming off a slick defensive play in the top of the ninth. The first pitch is a ball. Sasaki kicks and fires his second offer. Soriano, batting right-handed against the right-handed power pitcher, uncorks a deep drive on an upper-middle-of-the-plate fastball. It's going. Deep to right-center. Ichiro is at the wall and knows he can't reach it. Mike Cameron climbs the fence, banging it because he knows what's about to happen. The Yankees have pulled off the sensational once more. The ball's over the fence. The game's over. The series? We'll see about that, but yes, probably.
Yankees 3, Mariners 1
Final: Yankees 3, Mariners 1

Dinn Mann is the editor-in-chief of MLB.com. Send comments, questions and suggestions to dinn.mann@mlb.com.